Last modified: September 17, 2021

What Not To Store In Your Garden Shed

What Not To Store In Your Garden Shed

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What Not To Store In Your Garden Shed

What Not To Store In Your Garden Shed

Written by Garden Buildings Direct
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It’s not easy deciding what items you can store in your garden shed. You start with plenty of space, and then it’s tough to get the doors to shut. If you’re unsure of what you can and should store in a garden shed, here’s some advice on what can go in and the items that are best left out.

Factors to Consider

There are three factors to consider when you are getting ready to store items in your garden shed.

  1. Temperatures that range from hot to cold can damage some items beyond repair. Wax, for example, can melt and freezing temperatures can ruin some food products.
  2. Moisture can ruin fuel and other petrol-based liquids. Fumes are another concern if the garden shed is not properly ventilated. Humidity is another concern, especially with materials that are prone to mold and mildew.
  3. Pests and critters will find a way into a tightly closed garden shed. Think about how much damage a small animal can do before storing household items in the outdoor shed.

What NOT to Store in a Garden Shed

Some items are obvious, though tempting to want to store in the shed. Furniture and appliances are examples. These large items take up space and are not intended for outdoor storage. They will get damaged and are expensive to repair if you want to use them later on. Here are some other items you want to keep out of the garden shed.

Some items are obvious, though tempting to want to store in the shed. Furniture and appliances are examples. These large items take up space and are not intended for outdoor storage. They will get damaged and are expensive to repair if you want to use them later on. Here are some other items you want to keep out of the garden shed.

Food

Buying food in bulk is a smart way to save money, but you don’t want to store it in a garden shed. Extreme temperatures, moisture, and pests can ruin the excess food. You only want to store food outdoors in a secure, climate-controlled space.

Canned goods are other items that don’t belong in your garden shed. The tins do contain metal that rusts and corrodes when exposed to moisture and humidity. The containments will spoil the food and are harmful to ingest.

Glue and Paint

The shelves in the shed will keep glue and paint out of the way, but it also ruins the products. Variable temperatures cause the chemicals in glues and paints to break down. High temperatures cause the mixtures to separate, and cold turns adhesives and paint into a thick, unusable glob.

Pet Food

Pet food can spoil in extreme temperatures. It also attracts pests and critters you don’t want inside your shed. When you can’t store pet food indoors, seal it in an airtight container.

Photos

Photographs depict precious memories. Photos are prone to developing mold in moisture conditions. Pictures can also become glued together in higher temperatures. Photos should be stored in a cool, dry environment.

Extra Bedding and Clothes

Mothballs work indoors and protect your clothes from insects, though the product leaves a musty smell. Your garden shed will not protect your clothing and bedding, even with the liberal use of mothballs.

To properly store extra bedding and clothes, seal the items in an airtight container with a few cedar chips. The articles are safe, and cedar keeps clothes fresh.

Store This in a Garden Shed

A good tip to remember is to only store outdoor items in a garden shed. They are already designed to withstand extreme temperatures, pests, and moisture. Here are some of the items you want to make room for in the shed.

Garden Tools

Tools and other implements you use in the garden belong in the shed. Some examples are shovels, brooms, rakes, and lawnmowers. Seeders and any electric tools such as weed eaters and blowers should also be stored with the other garden tools. Remove any batteries from tools before storage. Batteries need to be stored indoors or in sealed containers.

Propane Tanks

Even though fuels are susceptible to moisture-damage, it doesn’t include tightly sealed propane tanks. The tank is airtight, and water cannot seep in. Propane also freezes at -42°C and garden shed temperatures do not fall that cold.

Gasoline has a freezing temperature of -73°C. It can be stored in a garden shed, but there is a risk for moisture leaking in. Store any gasoline in sealed containers, it also prevents fumes from escaping.

Garden Chemicals

Some chemicals for lawns and gardens can withstand freezing temperatures, but not all. Before putting fertilizers and repellents for weeds and pests in the shed, read the product warning label. It will list best storage practices. If the item goes into the shed, make sure the chemicals are sealed away from small children and animals.

Garden Furniture

A garden shed is an ideal storage place for outdoor lawn and garden furniture. The frames and cushions are designed to withstand the weather. It is recommended that all cushions and pillows be washed off before storage. It helps reduce wear and tear, and the furniture is ready for use in the spring.

Outdoor Toys

Outdoor toys like bikes, tennis rackets, and inflatable pools should be stored in the garden shed, and not your home. These items can withstand rising and falling temperatures without any damage. It is best to store bicycles in a ventilated area.

Seasonal Décor

Lawn and garden décor themes change with the season. These items can go into the shed when not in use. Front door wreaths can also be stored with other seasonal items. It is a good idea to wrap the wreath in a type of covering. It will protect the garland from dust and any damage from pests.

Conclusion

Some things you do not want to store in your garden shed. This would include food, clothes, batteries and old photographs, to name a few. There are several items you should store in your shed. Knowing what to keep in the garden shed usually comes down to common sense. If the item is used outdoors, it is probably safe to store in the shed.

To be safe, always read product labels. Fluctuating temperatures can damage some items. You also want to ensure all stored items are protected from moisture and pets.

 

Featured Image Credit: TheDigitalArtist  / Pixabay
In Post Image Credit: 13smok  / Pixabay

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